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Author(s):Draut, T., and Silva, J
Title:Generation broke: The growth of debt among young Americans
Source:http://www.demos.org/pubs/Generation_Broke.pdf
Date:2004
Organization:Demos: A Network for Ideas and Action
Short Description:This briefing paper documents the rise in credit card and student loan debt between 1992 and 2001 and examines the factors contributing to young adults’ increased reliance on credit cards.
Annotation:Over the 1990s, credit card debt among young Americans rose dramatically—leaving many young adults over-extended and vulnerable to financial collapse. This briefing paper documents the rise in credit card and student loan debt between 1992 and 2001 and examines the factors contributing to young adults’ increased reliance on credit cards. Rising costs combined with slow real wage growth and skyrocketing college debt have eroded the economic security of today’s young adults.
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Associated Keywords:
Borrowing/Student Debt
Documents
National Perspectives

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