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Annotated Bibliography

Author(s):Berker, A., and Horn, L
Title:Work first, study second: Adult undergraduates who combine employment and postsecondary enrollment
Source:http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2003/2003167.pdf
Date:2003
Organization:National Center for Education Statistics
Short Description:Compares two groups of working undergraduates according to the emphasis they place on work versus postsecondary enrollment.
Annotation:This analysis compares two groups of working undergraduates according to the emphasis they place on work versus postsecondary enrollment. Demographic characteristics, employment and attendance patterns and study habits, and reliance on financial aid are examined.
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Associated Keywords:
Adult Students
Career Development
Documents
Employment and Workforce Development
Engagement
Non-traditional Students
Pell Grants
Persistence/Retention

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